Deeply buried

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One way to find deeply buried uraninite, therefore, would be to drill test holes in inclined aquifers. Wherever you found unusual concentrations of organic matter, you would move up the aquifer and drill again. If you found red oxidized sandstone, you would know that uraninite was somewhere between the two holes. Drafting his report to the Geological Survey, Love described the “soft porous, pink or tan concretionary sandstone rolls in which the uranium was discovered,” and added that “the commercial grade of some of the ore, the easy accessibility throughout the area, the soft character of the host rocks and associated strata, and the fact that strip-mining methods can be applied to all the deposits known at the present time, make the area attractive for exploitation.” With those sentences he had become, in both a specific and a general sense, the discoverer of uranium in commercial quantity in Wyoming and the progenitor of the Wyoming uranium industry-facts that were not at once apparent. Within the Survey, the initial effect of Love’s published report was to irritate many of his colleagues who were committed hydrothermalists and were zakelijke energie vergelijken prepared not to believe that uranium deposits could occur in any other way. They were joined in this opinion by the director of the Division of Raw Materials of the United States Atomic Energy Commission. A committee was convened in the Powder River Basin to confirm or deny the suspect discovery. All the members but one were hydrothermalists, and the committee report said, “It is true that high-grade mineral specimens of uranium ore were found, but there is nothing of any economic significance.” Within weeks, mines began to open in that part of the Powder River Basin. Eventually, there were sixty-four, the largest of which was Exxon’s Highland Mine. They operated for thirty-two years. They had removed fifteen million tons of uranium ore when Three Mile Island zakelijke energie shut them down. In i952, after Love’s report was published, the Laramie Republican and Boomerang proclaimed in a banner headline, ” LARAMIE MAN DISCOVERS URANIUM ORE IN STATE.” The announcement set off what Love described as “the first and wildest” of Wyoming’s uranium booms. “Hundreds came to Laramie,” he continued. “I was offered a million dollars cash and the presidency of a company to leave the U.S.G.S. At that time, my salary was $8,640.19 per year.”